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Roger Federer Wins Record-Breaking Eighth Wimbledon Title

Jamie Florence

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Roger Federer Wins Record-Breaking Eighth Wimbledon Title

He has played two Grand Slam events, the Australian Open and Wimbledon, and won them both, increasing his record total of major men’s singles titles to 19.

Two of his biggest rivals, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray, have unexpectedly faded, while Federer has continued to perform in Technicolor. This year he has a 31-2 record, including an 9-0 mark against top-10 players. He is 17-5 in tiebreakers, reflecting his seize-the-key-moment approach.

He is still ripping his backhand; still finding the corners of the box with his serve (he was not broken on Sunday); and, perhaps most important, still covering the court like a younger version of himself.

“I honestly didn’t think I was going to be able to run through top-10 players the way I am, win all these breakers, win all these big moments,” said Federer, who will turn 36 next month. “This is what’s made the difference for me. I’ve won all the big matches this year. It’s unbelievable.”

When Federer returned to the tour in January after a six-month layoff, he genuinely believed he would not peak until April. But having a fine chance at Wimbledon was always part of the plan and motivation for heading back on the road with his wife, Mirka, and their four young children.

Wimbledon was the big goal. It is Federer’s favorite tournament, the one that suits his elegant, attacking game and his personality best; the one where he made his first big career move by upsetting the seven-time champion Pete Sampras in the 2001 quarterfinals. It is also the one where Federer won his first Grand Slam singles title, in 2003.

On Sunday, he broke his tie with Sampras and the 19th-century player William Renshaw by becoming the first man to win eight Wimbledon singles titles. (Martina Navratilova won the women’s event nine times.)

Federer said the men’s record was not a number he had in his sights when he was young.

“Winning eight is not something you can ever aim for, in my opinion,” he said. “If you do, I don’t know, you must have so much talent and parents and the coaches that push you from the age of 3 on, who think of you like a project. I was not that kid. I was just really a normal guy growing up in Basel, hoping to make a career on the tennis tour.”

Photo

Marin Cilic, right, slipping on the grass during the final. He needed medical treatment for a blister on his left foot after the second set.

Credit
Glyn Kirk/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

He did eventually leave his home and his parents in his early teens to board at a tennis center in a French-speaking region of Switzerland. He struggled there emotionally for a time, but it turned out to be one of the many decisions that led him to become the champion that he is.

He made another right move before this Wimbledon, skipping the clay-court season and the French Open, which Rafael Nadal won for the 10th time, to be fresh and healthy for the grass.

It is perhaps no coincidence that two of Federer’s younger opponents — Alexandr Dolgopolov in the first round and Cilic in the final — were hampered by physical problems, while Federer remained pain free, even if he did have to battle a summer cold throughout the event.

Cilic, 28 and seeded No. 7, overwhelmed Federer in the semifinals of the 2014 United States Open en route to the title. Cilic also had three match points against Federer in the Wimbledon quarterfinals last year before Federer prevailed in five sets.

An epic match on Sunday would have been no surprise. Instead, Cilic struggled with his consistency and his emotions. With a deep blister on his left foot that he said had limited his lateral movement, he began sobbing in his chair on a changeover while trailing, 0-3, in the second set, putting a white towel over his head as a physician and a trainer huddled around and attended to him.

He later explained that the tears were a result not of the pain but of the realization that he would be unable to perform at his best.

“Obviously, was very tough emotionally, because I know how much I went through the last few months in preparation with everything,” Cilic said. “It was also tough because of my own team. They did so much for me. I just felt it was really bad luck.”

Photo

Roger Federer is the first man since Bjorn Borg in 1976 to win Wimbledon without dropping a set.

Credit
Pool photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas

He eventually returned to the court, receiving a roar of support from the Centre Court crowd. He then changed his tactics to serve-and-volley to avoid long, grinding rallies and preserve his foot. He held serve with an acrobatic backhand half-volley drop-shot winner to stop a Federer streak of five consecutive games.

But there was no halting Federer’s momentum even if Federer, unbeknown to his audience, was harboring a few doubts. “At two sets to love and 2-all, I was thinking I’m going to lose this set, because I have never won Wimbledon without losing a set,” he said.

But in this charmed season, not even negative thinking can stop the Federer juggernaut, and he eventually closed out the match with an ace. This time, there was no celebratory tumble to the grass, as in 2007 or 2012. Compared with the euphoria of this year’s Australian Open triumph, the sensation and his immediate reaction were more subdued.

“I agree,” Federer said, still walking in the corridors. “Australia was a totally different vibe. It was so unexpected. Here I was made the favorite already before the tournament, which I found quite strange, and then that sometimes unfortunately takes the edge away a little bit.”

There were still powerful emotions at work, and he was soon in tears of his own as he sat in his chair and looked in the direction of the players’ box, where his 3-year-old twin sons had joined his 7-year-old twin daughters.

Federer has shed plenty of tears of joy on Centre Court, but this moment caught him by surprise.

“That was really the first moment I had to myself out there,” he said. “And I guess that’s when it sunk in that, man, I was able to win Wimbledon again, and I broke a record, and my family is there to share it with me. I was hoping the boys were going to be there, too, not just the girls. And so I just felt so happy, and I guess I also realized how much I had put into it to be there. It was all those things together.”

So much does indeed have to go just right to win eight titles at a tennis temple like the All England Club — to produce a player like Federer who is built to win pretty but also built to last.

 

Via: NYTimes

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WWE’s First-Ever Women’s Match in United Arab Emirates Takes Place

Jack Evans

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WWE’s First-Ever Women’s Match in United Arab Emirates Takes Place

 

united arab emirates sasha banks alexa bliss video

Sasha Banks and Alexa Bliss wrestled WWE’s first ever women’s match in the United Arab Emirates on Thursday and “The Boss” got incredibly emotional talking about it afterward.

Banks and Bliss both wrestled in full body suits and according to WWE there were chants of “this is hope” from both sexes in the crowd during the match.

An emotional Sasha Banks spoke to WWE.com when it was all over and while fighting back tears said, “The moment the announcer announced that this is gonna be a women’s match you could hear the crowd care. The moment I stood out there and I saw little girls, it just … it made everything worth it.”

Sasha continued, “Because this is what I feel like I was put on this earth to do. I wanna make a change in the world. I wanna empower women and I want to let them know that their dreams are endless and they can achieve anything.”

Watch the clips from their historic contest below, as well as SB’s post-match interview.

 

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Tito Santana On Which Match Stood Out In His WWE Career

Jack Evans

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Tito Santana On Which Match Stood Out In His WWE Career

 

Tito Santana spoke with ESPN on his pro wrestling career and life after he retired. Here are some of the highlights:

Match that stood out in his WWE career:

“It was probably when I wrestled Greg ‘The Hammer’ Valentine in Baltimore. I had been chasing him for the Intercontinental Championship, and finally I beat him in a cage match and there were maybe only 18,000 people at capacity, but it was sold out. The ‘pop’ that we got when I won the match was just unbelievable.”

Life after pro wrestling:

“I’m a schoolteacher. I’ve been teaching school, this is my 21st year. I’m a Spanish teacher in the middle school here in the town that I live, in Roxbury, New Jersey. Then, a couple of weekends a month, I go and I make appearances and once in a while, believe it or not, I still get in the ring. I don’t do much in the ring, but I still like to lace up the boots and get out there. It doesn’t get old to hear the response from the wrestling fans because they appreciate the work that you did. That’s what you know, with the applause and the cheers for you. It never gets old to hear the applause. In the small shows, you get to meet the wrestling fans and they always bring up moments that they remember.”

Tito Santana Talks Hulk Hogan's Role In His Career, What Vince McMahon Told Him Before WrestleMania

Transitioning from pro wrestler to teacher:

“I retired from the WWF in 1993 and I tried – me and Sgt. Slaughter tried – to run a league out of Chicago for a year and then it folded. Then I was doing independent shows. In the independent market you could wrestle Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and still make a pretty good living on those three days, so I liked that routine. I started subbing because I didn’t have anything else to do in the middle of the week. So, I started subbing for two years and in my town, they offered me a gym position. One thing led to another and I kind of didn’t — I used to come home exhausted being a gym teacher and I had my Spanish degree, so I talked to the guy hiring in town and he said, ‘Well, we have four openings.’ So I came into the classroom and I really enjoy what I’m doing now. I’ve been doing it for 16 years, Spanish.”

Source: ESPN

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WWE Officials Considering Australian Global Warning PPV in 2018

Jack Evans

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WWE Officials Considering Australian Global Warning PPV in 2018

 

global warning wwe australia melbourne cricket ground

Pro Wrestling Sheet has learned there have been serious internal discussions within WWE regarding a possible Global Warning pay-per-view event that would take place next year in Australia.

For those who don’t remember, WWE Global Warning Tour 2002 took place in Melbourne and over 50,000 people attended the live event. We’re told officials want to top that in a big way next year.

Sources with direct knowledge say WWE have discussed running Global Warning II in October at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, which holds 100,000 people. This time, however, they want to broadcast the event on PPV and the WWE Network.

Nothing official has been set quite yet, but we’re told things are headed in the right direction.

 

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